Olamide

Travelling While Black

Olamide Samuel

A first-hand account of the restrictive visa system impacting diversity at nuclear policy conferences

As the 2022 NPT RevCon enters its second week in New York, there have been reports of its noticeable lack of diversity. Olamide Samuel gives a personal account of his efforts to secure an Austrian and US visa to attend nuclear policy conferences this summer and calls on conference organisers to pay attention to the visa regimes that pose logistical barriers to entry for people from the global south.

Difficult Conversations: Fingers off the Button

Andrew Futter

On Thursday 5 May 2022, Prof Andrew Futter, Dr Cameron Hunter, Dr Olamide Samuel, Marion Messmer & Dr Matthew Bolton participated in the Difficult Conversation Series. ‘Fingers off the Button’ was the fourth installment of the series.

The panel primarily considered questions regarding nuclear weapons in the UK.  

View the recording of this session, by clicking the link below. 

"PUTIN’S WAR MIGHT BE DESTROYING THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ORDER"

Olamide Samuel

It appears that Russian aggression in Ukraine has taken extensive notes from the western playbook. Russia’s indiscriminate attacks that have jeopardized the safety of Ukraine’s nuclear power plants, its willingness to consider “sharing” its nuclear weapons with Belarus, and its ability to caricature the UN Security Council with false justifications, all point to one underlying fact: International law has been persistently weakened by exemptions….

Dr Olamide Samuel

Research Associate

"The Global South: Access to Nuclear Technologies and the Ban Treaty"

Andrew Futter & Olamide Samuel

Conventional wisdom holds that the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (the “ban treaty”) is about reinvigorating the push for nuclear disarmament and seeking justice for those adversely impacted by nuclear testing. Yet, there is hardly any indication from the nine current nuclear-armed states that they are serious about nuclear disarmament, and the countries responsible for nuclear weapons tests have failed to offer assistance or compensation to the victims. But by focussing only on frustrations about disarmament and nuclear testing, and by implications a very “Western” view of nuclear politics, both supporters and detractors have overlooked other national interests in states’ decisions to sign the ban treaty, especially the interests of states from the global south. ..

Prof. Andrew Futter

Principal investigator

Dr Olamide Samuel

Research Associate

TNA Project Runs procurement politics simulation

12th January 2022

The Third Nuclear Age Project Team ran a simulation of the politics of technological procurement.  The players were briefed on their starting positions and then were left free to choose whatever technologies they felt their team required to maintain national security over the long-term. This closed game was part of a process of developing and refining scenarios for future events with stakeholders.

Held at the imaginary “ERSATZ” classification level, the players took on the roles of senior defence procurement bureaucrats in the fictional region of “Archipelagia.” Each turn simulated 3 years of in-game time, allowing players to see the consequences of their procurement decisions and respond to their regional rivals. Competition was intense, and the players’ decisions resulted in a deteriorating security environment. At its conclusion, the game designers extrapolated how a military crisis in the region would play out in light of the new weapons capabilities that the players had selected.

Feedback from the players was incredibly positive, highlighting requirements and implications for the methodology of future games.

The finale session gave players an overview of actions taken by the game designers and their opponents – actions that were otherwise secret while the game was in progress.

The briefing was delivered by the fictional superpower’s military featured in the game.

Dr Olamide Samuel, published in the Green European Journal (GEJ)

The article (after offering a brief introduction to the global nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament architecture for non-specialist audiences) delves into the synergies between European Greens and advocates for the Nuclear Ban treaty. It then goes further to place European Greens ‘in the driver seat’ of EU foreign policy, and raises some questions regarding reconciling Green ideals with foreign (specifically nuclear) policy demands.

worms eyeview of green trees
Photo by Felix Mittermeier on Pexels.com

As part of The Third Nuclear Age project, Olamide in conjunction with the Managing the Atom project are reinvestigating African engagement with the global nuclear order.

Dr Olamide Samuel

Western-centric policymaking and scholarship tend to overlook the continent in discourse about the global nuclear order. Yet, upon closer investigation we find that African narratives, identities, and aspirations have had significant impact on the nuclear order from the Bandung conference, all the way to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Earlier this year, Olamide held a seminar at Harvard’s Belfer Center on ‘Agency, Africa and the Atom’, where the implications of the ‘single story’ of the African contribution to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament was discussed at length. This was followed by a Belfer Center panel discussion in March. Titled ‘Africa and the Atom: Rethinking African Agency in the Global Nuclear Order’, Olamide led a panel of experts in an in-depth conversation on the African nuclear narratives. The panelists were: Dr Hassan Elbahtimy (Kings College London), Dr Toni Haastrup (University of Stirling), Dr David Otwoma (Nuclear Regulatory Agency, Kenya) abd Dr Joelien Pretorius (University of the Western Cape)

The Inkstick special forum ‘Africa and the Atomic Bomb’, moves the conversation further, and features reflections from both the panellists and invited participants:


Inkstick Article

More Publications

Olamide SAmuel "Agency, Africa and the Atom" (Inkstick may 2021)

As part of The Third Nuclear Age project, Olamide in conjunction with the Managing the Atom project are reinvestigating African engagement with the global nuclear order.

Dr Olamide Samuel

Western-centric policymaking and scholarship tend to overlook the continent in discourse about the global nuclear order. Yet, upon closer investigation we find that African narratives, identities, and aspirations have had significant impact on the nuclear order from the Bandung conference, all the way to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Earlier this year, Olamide held a seminar at Harvard’s Belfer Center on ‘Agency, Africa and the Atom’, where the implications of the ‘single story’ of the African contribution to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament was discussed at length. This was followed by a Belfer Center panel discussion in March. Titled ‘Africa and the Atom: Rethinking African Agency in the Global Nuclear Order’, Olamide led a panel of experts in an in-depth conversation on the African nuclear narratives. The panelists were: Dr Hassan Elbahtimy (Kings College London), Dr Toni Haastrup (University of Stirling), Dr David Otwoma (Nuclear Regulatory Agency, Kenya) abd Dr Joelien Pretorius (University of the Western Cape)

The Inkstick special forum ‘Africa and the Atomic Bomb’, moves the conversation further, and features reflections from both the panellists and invited participants:

Prof Andrew Futter is on a panel at this event, taking place on 3rd February 2021.

Invitation to attend SCRAP’s webinar: Beyond Aegis: Strategic Stability and Emerging Technologies, on the 3rd February 2021 between 17:00-18:30 GMT

In November 2020, for the first time ever, an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICMB) was shot down by a U.S. warship: the Aegis Combat System. Such recent advancements in Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) systems and nuclear and conventional weapons pose a serious threat to global security.

How are emerging technologies shaping global security and stability? What implications do capabilities like the Aegis Combat System have for geopolitical dynamics? What changes in U.S. foreign policy can we expect to see with the Biden administration?

Our webinar is amongst the first to discuss the significance of the successful Aegis test for global stability. The webinar will explore the most recent developments in international relations alongside the politics and policies behind global security and powerful emerging technologies.

Panel:

Mr Ankit Panda, Stanton Senior Fellow in Nuclear Policy

Ms. Eva-Nour Repussard, Researcher, SCRAP Weapons

Mr Eric Gomez, Director, Defense Policy Studies, Cato Institute

Ms. Nancy Ehrenberg-Peters, Researcher, SCRAP Weapons

Professor Andrew Futter, University of Leicester

Mr Pavel Podvig, Director, Russian Nuclear Forces Project

Professor Dan Plesch, Director, CISD, SOAS

Register Here